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General
Old Trafford
Theatre of Dreams
Old Trafford 003
Owners Manchester United
Location Sir Matt Busby Way
Old Trafford
Trafford
Greater Manchester
Built 1909
Opened 19 February 1910
Tenants Manchester United (1910–present)
Capacity 75,731
Field dimensions 105 by 68 metres (114.8 × 74.4 yd)
Highest attendance 76,962 (Wolverhampton
vs Grimsby Town, 25 March 1939)

Old Trafford is a football stadium in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, and the home of Manchester United. With a capacity of 75,635, it is the largest club stadium of any football team in the United Kingdom, the third-largest stadium and the second-largest football stadium in the United Kingdom, and the eleventh-largest in Europe. It is about 0.5 miles (800 m) from Old Trafford Cricket Ground and the adjacent tram stop.

Nicknamed "The Theatre of Dreams" by Bobby Charlton, Old Trafford has been United's home ground since 1910, although from 1941 to 1949 the club shared Maine Road with local rivals Manchester City as a result of Second World War bomb damage. Old Trafford underwent several expansions in the 1990s and 2000s, including the addition of extra tiers to the North, West and East Stands, almost returning the stadium to its original capacity of 80,000. Future expansion is likely to involve the addition of a second tier to the South Stand, which would raise the capacity to around 95,000. The stadium's record attendance was recorded in 1939, when 76,962 spectators watched the FA Cup semi-final between Wolverhampton Wanderers and Grimsby Town.

Old Trafford has hosted FA Cup semi-finals, England fixtures, matches at the 1966 World Cup and Euro 96 and the 2003 Champions League Final, as well as rugby league's annual Super League Grand Final and the final of two Rugby League World Cups. It also hosted football matches at the 2012 Summer Olympics, including women's international football for the first time in its history.

External links

Manchester United FC
Manchester United FC Manchester United F.C.

Current seasonClub honoursManagersPlayersSquadsOld Trafford
History: SeasonsMunich air disaster

Premier League stadiums 2017–18

Anfield (Liverpool) · Bet365 Stadium (Stoke City) · Emirates Stadium (Arsenal) · Etihad Stadium (Manchester City) · Falmer Stadium (Brighton) · Goodison Park (Everton) · King Power Stadium (Leicester City) · Kirklees Stadium (Huddersfield Town) · Liberty Stadium (Swansea City) · London Stadium (West Ham United) · Old Trafford (Manchester United) · St. James' Park (Newcastle United) · St. Mary's Stadium (Southampton) · Selhurst Park (Crystal Palace) · Stamford Bridge (Chelsea) · The Hawthorns (West Bromwich) · Turf Moor (Burnley) · Vicarage Road (Watford) · Vitality Stadium (Bournemouth) · Wembley Stadium (Tottenham Hotspur)

1966 FIFA World Cup stadiums

Ayresome Park · Goodison Park · Hillsborough Stadium · Old Trafford · Roker Park · Villa Park · Wembley · White City Stadium

UEFA Euro 1996 stadiums

Anfield · City Ground · Elland Road · Hillsborough Stadium · Old Trafford · St James' Park · Villa Park · Wembley Stadium

220px-England crest 2009.svg
England England
220px-England crest 2009.svg

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